Triangle Wins

They have a fight. Triangle wins.

473 notes

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 
Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 
According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 
People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 
Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 

Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 

According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 

People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 

Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

(via redefiningbodyimage)

36 notes

pro-my-life:

I said this in response to my first honest to goodness anti-choice responder, but I feel the need to say it again - clearly, and not attached to their ignorance:

I do not accept the shame you are offering me. I put the physical, emotional, financial, marital health of my family first. I know exactly what bringing a child into the world entails, and do not take this responsibility lightly. I put the well being of my born children, my husband and yes- even myself, ahead of the fetus I was carrying.

Your opinion that I should have sacrificed my health, my ability to effectively parent my born children, the ability to financially support my family for the potential of the fetus just shows how much you value the quality of life of people walking this earth. I would not sacrifice my whole world for that fetus, and that is my choice.

(Source: lotus-gargen, via your-lies-ruin-lives)

33,788 notes

Anonymous asked: why is it okay for a black person to call another black person a nigger but when a white person does it, it's racist?

shytabbeetch:

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

eatpussylivehappy:

bitteroreo:

revolutionary-afrolatino:

why is it that when white people invaded North America and killed millions of Native Americans they were called “settlers” but when Black and Brown people cross the border they’re called “illegals”?

why is it that when white people kidnapped sold and enslaved millions Black people it was called a “trade”, but when Black and Brown people steal products it’s called “robbery”?

image

OHHHHHHH
SHITTTTTTTT

image

🙌🙌

182,199 notes

Before you say yes, get him angry. See him scared, see him wanting, see him sick. Stress changes a person. Find out if he drinks and if he does, get him drunk - you’ll learn more about his sober thoughts. Discover his addictions. See if he puts you in front of them. You can’t change people, baby girl. If they are made one way, it doesn’t just wear off. If you hate how he acts when he’s out of it now, you’re going to hate it much worse eight years down the road. You might love him to bits but it doesn’t change that some people just don’t fit.
inkskinned, “My father’s recipe for the man I should marry”  (via seabelle)

(Source: thelovewhisperer, via natureslittlecriminal)